Monthly Archives: October 2014

Butterfly Eggs

  As I was taking photos of the flowers and foliage of these wild sunflower plants (Helianthus simulans), I noticed this cluster of eggs on the underside of one of the upper leaves.     While I cannot positively identify these eggs as butterfly eggs, or identify them to a species, their shape and location... Continue reading »
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Pine Savannah

  Pine savannahs are one of my favorite habitat types.  Because they generally have only one layer (i.e., the grasses and forbs of the herbaceous layer), plus not infrequently a few scattered trees (hence the term savannah), one might be tempted to think of them as dull.     However, the number of different forb... Continue reading »
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Ladies’ Hatpins

  For me, these ladies’ hatpins (Eriocaulon decangulare – and others) add zip to the pine savannah landscape.  They are a vegetative expression of the artistic principle that less is more.     Although attractive when viewed closely, the flowers and inflorescences of individual plants are not particularly showy.  En masse, however, clusters and clusters... Continue reading »
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Black and White Bee ?

  Presumably the movement attracted my eye to this foraging black and white bee (or fly?), as it is reasonably well camoflauged against the maze of white flowers, green leaves, and dark “holes” in the vegetation (Eupatorium serotinum).     As to identification, a couple of possibilities seem likely.  First, if this individual has only... Continue reading »
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Red-cockaded Woodpeckers

  My first experiences with the red-cockaded woodpecker and their special habitat requirements extend back to somewhere around 1977.  As a wildlife biologist for the South Atlantic Division of the US Army Corps of Engineers I became interested in and involved with these birds and their habitat needs.     These are fascinating birds and... Continue reading »
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Water Lily Slough

  One of my working hypotheses is that when folks see an area for the first time, I believe there is a tenancy for them to think that things have always looked that way.  Here is a good personal example of this tenancy which I call landscape imprinting. I have seen and photographed this particular... Continue reading »
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Grasshopper and Sunflower

  With this species of native sunflower, what you see is what you get.  This species (Helianthus radula) does not have yellow ray flowers, and the involucral bracts and disk flowers are purple-colored.     Because there are no yellow rays (“petals”) one might be tempted to pass on by without looking closely at the... Continue reading »
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Picnic Table

  While I was wandering around on a plant identification excursion, I looked up and the distant gap in the trees and the picnic table arrested my attention.     The combination of the trees, the opening in the foliage, and the table seemed to literally cry out to be photographed.     Such as... Continue reading »
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Bird’s Nest

  I discovered this nest by accident as I started to walk around this sapling on the side of a forest trail.  It was located at eye level and it just appeared.     At this stage the nest seems to be pretty obvious and the light colors of the plant construction materials contrast sharply... Continue reading »
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Hibiscus Flowers

  Here is a test for you.  Which exposure do you prefer for these monochrome photos of an hibiscus flower?     View 1 is a little darker and the shadows and textures seem to show up well.     View 2 is a little lighter and the shadows and textures are less pronounced. I... Continue reading »
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